Opinion: Haunted Oklahoma

Oklahoma Paranormal Association team pictured with Dustin Pari from the original TV show Ghost Hunters. (Photo provided)

By Steve Coulter
Co-Publisher

 

Warning! Please don’t read any further if you’re afraid of ghost, ghouls, strange noises or bizarre occurrences. This column is not about fun Halloween entertainment. It’s about investigating real life paranormal activity in Oklahoma. Do not read anymore if that type of subject matter could disturb you.

 

At first I thought the Oklahoma Paranormal Association was just a joke or silly entertainment. But I quickly learned these investigators are serious and look into very scary and alarming stuff. They do not charge for their services provided.

Steve Coulter, Co-Publisher

 

The primary goal is to help those in need who may be experiencing real life paranormal activity in their home or business.

 

“We are actually working on a very bad case in Guthrie right now. It is a house that has very negative energy going on. The residents are having to deal with some pretty scary incidents happening. The home is experiencing paranormal activity and tormenting the residents,” said Oklahoma Paranormal Association Founder Tanya McCoy.

 

McCoy is the author of various books including Haunting Oklahoma City, Haunting Canadian County, Haunting Shawnee and many more. Her team of investigators look into paranormal activity all across the state.

 

Some of their experiences are disturbing, shocking and down right terrifying.

 

“You may just see shadow figures in your house, things getting moved and noises being made,” said McCoy.

 

Other paranormal cases are much more extreme.

 

“That’s where people are getting pinned or held down. They’re getting injured. Pinned down is like sleep paralysis. They feel like they are being held completely down. They can’t move and they can’t talk. It’s a very scary situation,” said McCoy.

 

Her team of paranormal investigators go into each situation with more equipment than the Ghostbusters.

 

“We have a night vision camera, K2 meters and parascopes. Parascopes pick up on static electricity and K2 meters pick up on EMF levels. So it picks up on two different forms of energy. We have touch lights, motion sensors, audio recorders, video recorders, hand held cameras, trigger objects and quite a few different things we use,” she said.

 

They consider themselves as paranormal researchers. They are doing private investigations and trying to figure out what’s happening in each situation. During the investigation they often experience the paranormal activity first hand.

 

“We’ve had things thrown at us. We’ve had people get completely sick. We’ve been on events where we had people get scratched. People knocked completely out. You never know what you’re walking into,” said McCoy.

 

Each investigation of a haunted home can take a couple weeks to a few months to gather all the information needed. After the investigation is complete they may need to cleanse the house. It all depends on the severity.

 

“We’ll bring a pastor in or their pastor in. Have them bless the house and do a prayer,” said McCoy.

 

Other instances they do a smudging with sage and Native American type cleansing. They consider it energy works to get whatever it is to move on.

 

But the paranormal cleansing isn’t a guarantee to get it to go away.

 

“We actually had one really bad case in Blanchard that the people had to just move. There was no way to get rid of it. It was just too heavy,” she said.

 

The Oklahoma Paranormal Association stays extremely busy all year long.

 

“For the past couple of years it’s been around the clock. It’s just been constantly busy. I’ve actually had to refer out cases to other teams. It can be overwhelming on how much we have to do,” said McCoy.

 

McCoy is a full time nurse and also teaches a class on paranormal psychology at Francis Tuttle. She says it’s important to seek help if you’re experiencing paranormal activity.

 

“Don’t be afraid to ask. Don’t be afraid to talk. We’re here to help you learn and here to help teach,” she said.

 

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